A critical evaluation on the cosmological argument for the existence of god

It does not allow a puzzling aspect of the explanandum to disappear: We cannot soundly infer any claims that attribute particular properties to x from either the claim that x exists or the claim that x has at least one property; indeed, the claim that x has at least one property no more expresses a particular property than the claim that x exists.

We can do so merely by consulting the definition and seeing that it is self-contradictory. Thus, for example, we can determine that there are no square circles in the world without going out and looking under every rock to see whether there is a square circle there. The theist responds that the PSR does not address logical contingency but metaphysical contingency.

Cosmological Argument

Both to count and to move from the past to the present, we cannot start from the indefinitely extendible. The universe began to exist. Rowe gives the example of a horse race. A collection formed by successive synthesis is not an actual infinite.

They phrase the argument in terms of contingent and necessary propositions. Otherwise put, then, the second key claim is that a being whose non-existence is logically impossible is greater than a being whose non-existence is logically possible.

Therefore, a triangle's nature—what it is—does not guarantee that one exists like unicorns—we know what they are, but that does not make them exist.

We can simply work with brute facts.

The Cosmological Argument for the existence of God - Assignment Example

Interestingly enough, this approach was anticipated by Aquinas in his third way in his Summa Theologica I,q. Similarly, the claim that an unlimited being B does not exist at W clearly entails that B never exists at W that is, that it is always true in W that B doesn't existbut it doesn't clearly entail that B necessarily doesn't exist that is, B exists at no logically possible world or B's existence is logically impossible.

Hence, total nothingness cannot be actual. Hence, total nothingness cannot be actual. Notice, for example, that the claim that x necessarily exists entails a number of claims that attribute particular properties to x.

If there is nothing, then there are no possible states of affairs, since nothing is actual to bring them about. Tales of the Rational, Freethought Press, The first, advocated by Aquinas, is based on the impossibility of an essentially ordered infinite regress. The triangle is caused by something else—which also must have a cause.

Critics reply that the principles then only have methodological or practical and not ontological justification. Next, while we often tend to think of existence as a property that things sort of "own"—that once something is created, existence is just part of what it is—this is not the case.

Thus, a being that is omniscient lacks the ability to create free beings and is hence not omnipotent. What causes or explains the existence of this contingent being must either be solely other contingent beings or include a non-contingent necessary being.

Since 2 it is possible that it is necessary that a supernatural being of some sort exists, 3 it is necessary that this being exists. Nothing moves without a prior mover.

RENE DESCARTES PROOF OF GOD’S EXISTENCE: ACRITICAL EXPOSITION Essay

Second, it becomes clear that the cosmological argument lies at the heart of attempts to answer the questions, and to this we now turn. Did I show you the particular causes of each individual in a collection of twenty particles of matter, I should think it very unreasonable should you afterwards ask me what was the cause of the whole twenty.

As Hume argued, there is no reason for thinking that the Causal Principle is true a priori, for we can conceive of events occurring without conceiving of their being caused, and what is conceivable is possible in reality This latter claim asserts that a being whose existence is necessary is greater than a being whose existence is not necessary.

This concept lies at the heart of the ontological argument see entry on ontological arguments. Therefore, the temporal series of events cannot be an actual infinite Craig Russell, following Humecontends that since we derive the concept of cause from our observation of particular things, we cannot ask about the cause of something like the universe that we cannot experience.

The universe is just here and that is that: There must be an initial cause of movement in the universe. He argues that the reasons often advanced for asymmetry, such as those given by Craig, are faulty.

However, there Guminski also showed that there is an alternative version AV of applying Cantorian set theory to the real world, the application of which does not generate counterintuitive absurdities. In my essay, I will be giving a critical evaluation on the cosmological argument for the existence of God.

The critical evaluation will be focused on what philosopher Thomas Aquinas stated on the existence of God through his cosmological argument. arguments or “proofs” have been formulated in support of God's existence. The best known of these are the cosmological, teleological, moral and ontological arguments respectively.

The Cosmological Argument or First Cause Argument is a philosophical argument for the existence of God which explains that everything has a cause, that there must have been a first cause, and that this first cause was itself uncaused. In the medieval epoch of philosophy, other arguments for the existence of God have been proposed by St.

Anselm, who formulated the first ontological argument; Avicena Averroes and Thomas Aquinas, who refined the cosmological argument (the kalam argument and the first way, respectively). The Cosmological Argument or First Cause Argument is a philosophical argument for the existence of God which explains that everything has a cause, that there must have been a first cause, and that this first cause was itself uncaused.

The Cosmological argument fits in with the God of classical theism (omnipotent, omnibenevolent, omniscient). It makes sense to think that there is an initial cause to the universe: this fits with our experience of events within the universe.

A critical evaluation on the cosmological argument for the existence of god
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Cosmological Argument (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)